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What’s the Difference Between Bacterial and Viral Conjunctivitis?

Is your eye red, swollen and teary? Conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye, is a likely culprit.

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the white part of the eye, and is usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection or a severe reaction to an allergen, such as pollen. Infectious conjunctivitis is highly contagious, so it’s best to head to your eye doctor as soon as possible to receive an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment plan.

What is Bacterial Conjunctivitis?

Bacterial conjunctivitis is an eye infection most commonly caused by staphylococcal, streptococcus or haemophilus bacteria. It generally affects one eye, but can be present in both eyes.

The most common symptoms include:

  • Whites of the eyes appear pink or red
  • Excessive tearing
  • Swollen eyelids
  • Burning in the eyes
  • Scratchy feeling in the eye
  • Yellow or green discharge from the eye
  • Crusting of the eyelids or lashes, especially in the morning

Bacterial conjunctivitis is generally treated with antibiotic eye drops or ointments to eliminate the infection.

What is Viral Conjunctivitis?

Viral conjunctivitis is the most common type of pink eye. It generally affects both eyes and often accompanies a cold, sore throat, runny nose or fever.

The most common symptoms include:

  • Whites of the eyes appear light pink or salmon color
  • Excessive tearing
  • No presence of discharge
  • Itchy eyes

Viral pink eye typically resolves on its own within three to seven days, and is no longer contagious once the eyes have stopped tearing. To alleviate any discomfort, your eye doctor may recommend placing cold compresses on the eyes or applying artificial tear eye drops several times throughout the day. Let your eye doctor know if the symptoms persist after a few days.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of conjunctivitis, contact Lakeline Vision Source in Cedar Park to schedule an eye exam today.

At Lakeline Vision Source, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 512-918-3937 or book an appointment online to see one of our Cedar Park eye doctors.

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Q&A:

Can I wear contact lenses with infectious pink eye?

No. Contact lens wear is not recommended if you have an eye infection, as the virus or bacteria can remain on your contact lenses and reinfect your eyes following treatment. It is best to wait until the eye infection has completely cleared and your eye doctor has approved you to wear contact lenses again. All disposable lenses, whether daily or monthly, that were worn when the eyes were infected should be disposed of and a fresh pair used when you resume wearing lenses.

How can I prevent pink eye from spreading to other family members?

The best way to prevent conjunctivitis from spreading is to be careful with personal hygiene. Encourage all members of your household to wash their hands frequently with soap and to use separate towels. Also, avoid sharing sheets and pillows, and remind all family members to refrain from touching their eyes as much as possible.

Can Contact Lenses Get Stuck in My Eye?

If you’ve always wondered (or worried) about your contact lenses getting stuck in your eyes, you’re in good company. Many new contact lens wearers have this concern! To relieve your fears – no, it’s impossible for contacts to get totally stuck behind your eyes. However, they can become dislodged and get stuck beneath your eyelid. In fact, many people call our Cedar Park, Texas , eye doctor for help when this happens. Usually, we can provide tips for how to remove the contact on your own, but when this doesn’t work – you’ll need to visit our optometric team at Lakeline Vision Source for assistance.

Facts about when contact lenses get stuck

  • When a contact lens dries out, it can get stuck to your cornea. This happens most frequently as a result of sleeping with lenses.
  • Contact lenses can get dislodged and move out of position under your eyelid. Typically, this occurs due to rubbing your eyes or physical contact with the lenses.
  • Pieces of contact lenses can stay in your eye for a long time, unintentionally. Sometimes a fragment of torn lens gets stuck under the eyelid. Rinsing your eyes with saline will generally loosen the lens so you can remove it gently and easily.
  • Contact lenses cannot slide behind your eye, getting stuck there forever. While contacts may get lodged under your eyelid, your eyelids serve as a barrier to block anything from slipping behind your eyeball.
  • Contact lenses stuck in your eye do not seriously endanger your health. It may not be good for you, but a lens that’s stuck will generally do nothing more than cause irritation.

How can I remove a soft contact lens that’s stuck in my eye?

  1. First of all, wash your hands with soap and dry on a lint-free towel.
  2. Rewetting eye drops are pretty much all you need. Don’t be economical when you use them, because the more moisture you add to your eye, the better the chances that the lens will simply dislodge and slip out on its own. Close your eyes and blink repeatedly to disperse the lubricating fluid.
  3. If applying eye drops doesn’t do the trick, then gently massage the upper and lower portions of your eyelid until the lens comes out. The key word here is “gently,” don’t apply any forceful pressure.
  4. If a mild massage doesn’t release the lens, then grip your eyelid and flip it upwards (inside out). Look in the mirror to search for any pieces of your lens and carefully remove them. Afterwards, rinse your eye with saline.
  5. If none of these techniques work for you, double check to make sure the lens didn’t fall out already (and you’re just feeling the sensation left by mild irritation). If the lens is still there, please call our Cedar Park, Texas , eye doctor and schedule an urgent eye exam.

What do I do if my hard gas permeable contacts get stuck?

If you wear hard contact lenses, you’ll need to handle a stuck lens differently from a soft lens.

Applying rewetting eye drops is an essential first step. Then, close your eyes and blink. This may be sufficient to dislodge the lens, moving it back to the center of your eye where you can remove it as usual.

With hard contact lenses, don’t massage your eyelid! This can cause the lens to scrape your cornea, leading to a painful corneal abrasion.

If lubricating the lens doesn’t help, use your fingertip to gently press your eye near the edge of your contact lens. This can break the suction, unsticking the lens so you can remove it easily. Or, pick up a special suction cup device (sold with the contact lenses products in most stores) that can attached to your lens to gently pull it off from your eye surface.

Why does my eye hurt after removing a stuck contact lens?

Generally, this is just a symptom caused by mild irritation. Sterile saline or artificial tears eye drops can help moisten your eye to enhance comfort. With a bit of time, the irritation will usually disappear.

However, if the pain persists and your eye appears red, reach out to our Cedar Park, Texas , eye care center for instructions. You’ll need an eye exam to determine if any medical treatment is necessary.

Stop squinting – Contact Lens Sunglasses Exist!

Sunglasses have always been your go-to for shading your eyes to stop squinting in the sun, but they’re not always the most convenient accessory. They fog up and slip down your nose when you work up a sweat, and need to be wiped off when you’re hit by water spray at the beach. But what’s the alternative? Is there another way to protect your eyes from UV rays and soothe your vision from the blinding Cedar Park, Texas , light?

Our Lakeline Vision Source eye doctors are pleased to offer a revolutionary solution – the new ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™ Light Intelligent Technology™ contact lenses. These contact lenses that can act like sunglasses were given FDA approval in April 2018. And they were also awarded to be one of TIME’s Best Inventions of 2018.

Now that we’ve caught your eye with this hot new tech, read on for more info about Acuvue’s contact lenses sunglasses from your favorite Cedar Park, Texas optometrists’ office.

Smart & Dynamic Contact Lenses

ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™ Light Intelligent Technology™ are the first contacts to be developed that “read” the light conditions in your environment and adapt to enhance your vision. These lenses use photochromic technology that was designed in partnership with Transitions™, the leading manufacturer of photochromic eyeglasses lenses. The contacts incorporate a special additive that darkens automatically when exposed to light.

When exposed to outdoor UV and/or blue light from digital devices, these contacts react quickly. And because they respond “intelligently” to changing light conditions outdoors, the lenses do not typically remain in the darkest state the whole time you’re outside. So when you’re on an open stretch of beach, they’re not the same as when you’re standing under the shade of a wide awning. The effects on the appearance of your eyes is minimal, and when you come indoors, they fade back to clear within 60 seconds.

Sharper, Safer Vision – All Day Long

Surveys estimate that 94% of all consumers compensate for bright light conditions by squinting, dimming indoor lights, reducing screen brightness, or shading their eyes. ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™ Light Intelligent Technology™ filter indoor and outdoor light, including blue light rays that threaten your eye health. At night, these contact lenses sunglasses are also useful, as they reduce haloes and starburst. Your vision will improve during all hours of the day.

See the Benefits of Contact Lenses Sunglasses

  • Experience the comfort and convenience of going frame-free – while still safeguarding your vision
  • Highest level of UV protection in a contact lens
  • When you go into a darker environment, these contacts help your vision recover from bright light up to 5 seconds faster than normal
  • Ultimate gain, with only a minimal change to the appearance of your eyes and face
  • Crisp nighttime vision, with no disturbing haloes or starbursts
  • Soothing vision all day long, without bothersome glare

Visit our Cedar Park, Texas , eye doctor to try ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™

We’re thrilled to offer these breakthrough contacts at Lakeline Vision Source! Our eye doctors would like to point out that while these contact lenses sunglasses are truly remarkable, we don’t recommend that you use them to replace your sunglasses all of the time.

While they offer exceptional UV protection to the areas they cover, contact lenses still leave other parts of your eyes and the surrounding ocular tissue naked to UV light. Sunglasses cover a wider area and therefore give additional protection. In addition, car windshields block close to 100% of UV light, so your ACUVUE® OASYS with Transitions™ won’t darken when you’re behind the wheel. To solve that problem, they can easily be worn under non-prescription sunglasses. So when you visit Lakeline Vision Source for your contact lenses fitting, check out our nonprescription sunglasses collection too!

At Lakeline Vision Source, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 512-918-3937 or book an appointment online to see one of our Cedar Park eye doctors.

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